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P573 Comparative effectiveness of second-line biological therapies for Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease in patients with prior failure of anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment

Hyun, H.K.(1);Yu, J.(1);Kang, E.A.(1);Park, J.(1);Park, S.J.(1);Park, J.J.(1);Kim, T.I.(1);Kim, W.H.(1);Cheon, J.H.(1);

(1)Yonsei University College of Medicine, Gastroenterology, Seoul, Korea- Republic Of

Background

Therapeutic options for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have increased since the introduction of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors a few decades ago. However, direct comparisons of the effectiveness of second-line biological agents in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are lacking.

Methods

Patients with UC or CD who experienced anti-TNF treatment failure and subsequently used vedolizumab, ustekinumab, or tofacitinib as a second-line drug were retrospectively recruited. The primary outcomes were the clinical remission rate at week 16 and the cumulative relapse rate 48 weeks after receiving induction therapy.

Results

A total of 94 patients with UC or CD experienced anti-TNF treatment failure and received vedolizumab (UC : 37; CD : 28), ustekinumab (CD : 16), or tofacitinib (UC : 13). The clinical remission rates were not significantly different between the vedolizumab and tofacitinib groups in UC patients (56.8% vs. 46.2%, p = 0.509). In CD patients, the clinical remission rates were not significantly different between the vedolizumab and ustekinumab groups (53.6% vs. 50.0%, p = 0.820). Moreover, the cumulative rates of clinical relapse were not significantly different between the vedolizumab and tofacitinib groups in UC patients and between the vedolizumab and ustekinumab groups in CD patients (p = 0.396 and p = 0.692, respectively). Safety profiles were also similar among the treatment groups in both UC and CD patients.

Conclusion

After prior anti-TNF therapy failure, vedolizumab and tofacitinib in UC patients and vedolizumab and ustekinumab in CD patients showed similarities in terms of the efficacy in inducing and maintaining a clinical response.

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