SciCom
04October2018

ECCO Fellowship Study Synopsis: Sales Ibiza

Sales Ibiza, ECCO Fellow 2018

Monocyte-derived macrophages as crucial players in the resolution of inflammation and tissue repair in Inflammatory Bowel Disease  

 

03 SciCom 2a MASTER Ibiza Martinez Sales image
Sales Ibiza
© 
Sales Ibiza

Background

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is characterised by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract leading to debilitating symptoms. No curative therapies are currently available for IBD, with the consequence that the disease has a significant impact on the emotional, financial and social status of patients and their families. Although most studies conducted on IBD over the past few decades have investigated abnormal adaptive immunity, the focus has recently shifted towards alterations in innate immune response. Recent data suggest a causal link between defects in the resolution of inflammation associated with impaired bacterial clearance, excessive cytokine secretion and altered monocyte-macrophage (Mφ) transition in patients with IBD.

Posted in ECCO News, SciCom, Committee News, Fellowships & Grants Synopsis Reports, Volume 13, Issue 3

04October2018

ECCO Fellowship Study Synopsis: Mathieu Uzzan

Mathieu Uzzan, ECCO Fellow 2018

Deciphering the gut-specific B cell response in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)  

 

03 SciCom 6a MASTER Mathieu UzzanMathieu Uzzan
© 
Mathieu Uzzan

Aim of the research

Given that there is a large complement of mucosal B cells that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the microbiome and in mucosal homeostasis, it is likely that they play an important but yet understudied role in the pathogenesis of IBD. Therefore, we hypothesize that mucosal inflammation as seen in IBD will induce a B cell response with homeostatic and perhaps pathogenic properties.

Posted in ECCO News, SciCom, Committee News, Fellowships & Grants Synopsis Reports, Volume 13, Issue 3

04October2018

ECCO Fellowship Study Synopsis: Federica Branchi

Federica Branchi, ECCO Fellow 2018

Investigation of the role of Par4-associated cell polarity and associated barrier defects in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases  

 

03 SciCom 1a MASTER Federica Branchi fotoFederica Branchi
© 
Federica Branchi

Aim of the research

In Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD), epithelial barrier defects occur as a consequence of chronic inflammation. Recent research has suggested that cell polarity alterations may be upstream of barrier defects and additionally play a role in IBD-associated carcinogenesis (colitis-associated and small intestinal carcinoma). Par4 is a gene encoding a protein crucial in the development of cell polarity. LKB1, its human homologue, is mutated in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), a genetic condition characterised by a higher risk of epithelial cancers. Considering the pivotal role of Par4/LKB1 in the development of epithelial cell polarity, this project aims to assess its involvement in IBD-associated barrier defects and carcinogenesis.

Posted in ECCO News, SciCom, Committee News, Fellowships & Grants Synopsis Reports, Volume 13, Issue 3

08June2018

New SciCom Members

Janneke van der Woude, SciCom Chair

Janneke van der Woude1
Janneke van der Woude
© ECCO

During the ECCO’18 Vienna Congress the Scientific Committee cordially welcomed Michael Scharl and Sebastian Zeissig as new members.

Posted in ECCO News, SciCom, Committee News, Volume 13, Issue 2

27April2018

ECCO-AOCC Visiting Travel Grant 2018

Jihye Park, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

ParkJihye Park
© Jihye Park

Most patients with chronic IBD are diagnosed at a young age. After baseline diagnosis many of these young patients have to undergo repeated imaging procedures during the variable clinical course of their disease. Ultrasound, CT and MRI are used to image transmural alterations and extra-intestinal manifestations of the disease and to monitor response to treatment. 

Posted in ECCO News, SciCom, Committee News, Volume 13, Issue 1

27April2018

ECCO Fellowships and Grants Report

Janneke van der Woude, SciCom Chair

Janneke van der Woude1
Janneke van der Woude
© ECCO

One of the main goals of ECCO is to promote IBD-related basic and clinical research as well as to foster interaction and productive collaboration among European research groups working in the IBD field. To achieve this goal, ECCO continues to award Grants, Fellowships and Travel Awards.

For 2018 the number of awardees has increased to an amazing total of more than 30.

 

Posted in ECCO News, SciCom, Committee News, Volume 13, Issue 1

27April2018

Report on the 6th SciCom Workshop at ECCO'18

Shomron Ben-Horin and Michael Scharl, SciCom Members

Shomron Ben Horin
Shomron Ben-Horin
© ECCO
Michael Scharl3
Michael Scharl
© ECCO

Fat in IBD – Much more than an innocent bystander 

Within the framework of the 6th SciCom Workshop, the role of fat and lipids in IBD pathogenesis was highlighted. Six highly interesting talks shed light on the fact that fat is much more than an innocent bystander in IBD.

Posted in ECCO News, SciCom, Committee News, ECCO'18, Congress News, Volume 13, Issue 1

12December2017

Fecal Transplantation Using a Novel Conditioning Method for Donor and Recipient in Mild to Moderate Treatment Refractory Colitis in IBD

Arie Levine, ECCO Grant Winner

Arie LevineArie Levine © ECCO

Fecal microbial transplantation (FMT) is an exciting and evolving methodology to transform the microbiota in microbiota-related diseases. The rationale behind FMT is "transfer of a healthy microbiota" from a donor to a patient with IBD, leading to a change in recipient microbiota towards that of a healthy donor. However, current methods are simplistic. Random healthy donors do not necessarily have an appropriate microbiota, and transferred microbiota may not colonise the recipient’s gut. Diet can rapidly degrade certain taxa or increase others, such that if the recipient diet is not appropriate, donor microbiota expansion may not occur or functionality may be impaired.

Posted in ECCO News, SciCom, Committee News, Volume 12, Issue 4

12December2017

SWEETEN: Glycans as novel immunomodulators in IBD

Salome de Pinho, ECCO Grant Winner

PortraitsSalome de Pinho © ECCO

Aims of the research

The current therapeutic strategies for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are limited by effectiveness and/or toxicity, and the selection of patients for therapy remains a major challenge. These clinical concerns highlight the unmet need to identify key mechanisms (molecular markers) capable of being selectively targeted with new and optimised therapies. Glycosylation is a major post-translational mechanism characterised by the addition of carbohydrate structures (glycans) to essentially all cells [1]. Evidence in other immune-mediated disorders has shown that protein N-glycosylation, particularly branched N-glycans, regulates T cell immune response and controls the threshold of T cell activation [2].

Posted in ECCO News, SciCom, Committee News, Volume 12, Issue 4

12December2017

Predicting response to treatment in patients with IBD

Bram Verstockt, ECCO Grant Winner

Portraits2Bram Verstockt © ECCO

Aims of the research

The introduction of new non-anti-TNF agents such as the anti-adhesion and anti-IL-12/IL-23 molecules will increase the therapeutic armamentarium for patients with IBD. It is nevertheless anticipated that clinical response and adverse events will vary significantly between individuals. Therefore, we need predictors of efficacy and safety so that we can select the right drug at the right time for the right patient. Targeted strategies in patients with poor prognostic factors and head-to-head trials are currently lacking.

Posted in ECCO News, SciCom, Committee News, Volume 12, Issue 4