Articles tagged with: Y-ECCO Literature Review

12December2017

Y-ECCO Literature Review Introduction

Dominik Bettenworth, Y-ECCO Literature Review Admin

Dominik Bettenworth 2
Dominik Bettenworth 
© ECCO

 

Dear Y-ECCO Friends,

A warm welcome to the Y-ECCO Literature Review section, where you will find a summary and discussion of cutting-edge clinical trials as well as basic science studies in the field of IBD. 

If you are a Y-ECCO Member and you are looking for an opportunity to get actively involved in ECCO and gain some visibility, contribute your article to the Y-ECCO Literature Review corner, together with a short self-description and your picture.

Posted in ECCO News, Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Committee News, Y-ECCO, Volume 12, Issue 4

12December2017

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Sandra Bohn Thomsen

Sandra Bohn Thomsen

27 Sandra Thomsen 8867 2
Sandra Bohn Thomsen 
© Sandra Bohn Thomsen

Evolution after anti-TNF discontinuation in patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A multicentre long-term follow-up study

Casanova MJ, Chaparro M, García-Sánchez V, Nantes O, Leo E, Rojas-Feria M, et al.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2017;112:12031

Posted in ECCO News, Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Committee News, Y-ECCO, Volume 12, Issue 4

12December2017

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Kapil Sahnan

Kapil Sahnan

29 Sahnan Pic for ECCO 2
Kapil Sahnan 
© Kapil Sahnan

Laparoscopic ileocaecal resection versus infliximab for terminal ileitis in Crohn’s disease: A randomised controlled, open-label, multicentre trial 

Ponsioen CY, de Groof EJ, Eshuis EJ, Gardenbroek TJ, Bossuyt PMM, Hart A, et al. 
Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2017;2:785–92. 

Posted in ECCO News, Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Committee News, Y-ECCO, Volume 12, Issue 4

12December2017

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Bobby Zhao Sheng Lo

Bobby Zhao Sheng Lo

28 Bobby Zhao Sheng Lo 2
Bobby Zhao Sheng Lo
© 
Bobby Zhao Sheng Lo

Prediction of complicated disease course for children newly diagnosed with Crohn’s disease: A multicentre inception cohort study

Kugathasan S, Denson LA, Walters TD, Kim MO, Marigorta UM, Schirmer M, et al.
Lancet. 2017;389:1710–8.

Posted in ECCO News, Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Committee News, Y-ECCO, Volume 12, Issue 4

11December2018

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Sasha Fehily

Sasha Fehily

CALM Trial

Sasha Fehily
Sasha Fehily 
© ECCO

Introduction

There has been a recent shift in Crohn’s Disease (CD) management away from the conventional focus on short-term clinical outcomes and towards the maintenance of long-term remission.  In 2015 the International Organisation for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases released a consensus statement recommending a treat-to-target approach [1]. The STRIDE initiative recommended pursuing treatment escalation in order to achieve the treatment targets of clinical remission and mucosal healing, with adjunctive use of normal C-reactive protein (CRP) and faecal calprotectin (FC) levels. However, the authors noted that prospective studies would be needed to confirm that achievement of these targets would alter the natural history of disease and improve patients’ quality of life.

Posted in ECCO News, Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Committee News, Y-ECCO, Volume 13, Issue 4

30April2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Ivan Lyutakov

Ivan Lyutakov

Serum Concentration of 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one Are Associated With Bile Acid Diarrhea in Patients With Crohn's Disease

Battat R, Duijvestein M, Vande Casteele N, Singh S, Dulai PS, Valasek MA, Mimms L, McFarland L, Hester KD, Renshaw M, Jain A, Sandborn WJ, Boland BS

Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Nov 15. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2018.11.012    

Ivan Lyutakov
Ivan Lyutakov 
© Ivan Lyutakov

Introduction

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) comprises a heterogeneous group of chronic inflammatory disorders with two main conditions, Crohn’s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC) [1]. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) and bile acid diarrhoea (BAD) have been recognised to be a common cause of chronic diarrhoea, and this recognition has led to the initiation of a search for new screening tests (biomarkers). BAM is one of the mechanisms leading to microscopic colitis, a key factor in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome-diarrhoea, and molecular mechanisms of BAM are found in IBD patients with or without involvement of the terminal ileum. BAM/BAD is more frequently found in CD than in UC, and the obvious aetiology for BAM in CD is either ileal resection or ileal disease [2]. The pathophysiology of diarrhoea in CD is multifactorial but there are two key factors, colonic water and electrolyte absorption, which can be impaired directly by colonic inflammation or indirectly by increased concentrations of bile acids having secretory effects, referred to as BAD [3].

Posted in ECCO News, Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Committee News, Y-ECCO, Volume 14, Issue 1

30April2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: James Gauci

James Gauci

Risankizumab in patients with moderate to severe Crohn's Disease: An open-label extension study

Feagan BG, Panés J, Ferrante M, Kaser A, D'Haens GR, Sandborn WJ, Louis E, Neurath MF, Franchimont D, Dewit O, Seidler U, Kim KJ, Selinger C, Padula SJ, Herichova I, Robinson AM, Wallace K, Zhao J, Minocha M, Othman AA, Soaita A, Visvanathan S, Hall DB, Böcher WO

Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018;3:671–80. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2468-1253(18)30233-4   

James Gauci
James Gauci 
© James Gauci

Introduction

Management of Crohn’s Disease involves the suppression of inflammation through administration of immunosuppressive drugs. While conventional therapies such as corticosteroids and thiopurines exert a broad effect on the immune system, the advent of biological agents has allowed for selective targeting of cytokines and integrins.

Unfortunately, a third of patients treated with tumour necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists demonstrate a primary non-response, with another third developing either secondary failure or intolerance. These patients will then have a lower chance of responding to treatment with other TNF antagonists or with the integrin antagonist vedolizumab.

Posted in ECCO News, Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Committee News, Y-ECCO, Volume 14, Issue 1

30April2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Aravind Gokul Tamilarasan

Aravind Gokul Tamilarasan

Optimised infliximab monotherapy is as effective as optimised combination therapy, but is associated with higher drug consumption in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Drobne D, Kurent T, Golob S, Švegl P, Rajar P, Hanžel J, Koželj M, Novak G, Smrekar N, Ferkolj I, Štabuc B

Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2019;49:880–9

Aravind Gokul Tamilarasan
Aravind Gokul Tamilarasan 
© Aravind Gokul Tamilarasan

Introduction

Since the publication of the landmark SONIC trial in 2010 [1], the use of combination biologic–immunomodulator therapy has been considered best standard practice for patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) who have failed topical therapies or immunomodulators (thiopurines or methotrexate). More recently, real-world data from the PANTS (Personalised anti-TNF therapy in Crohn’s Disease) study demonstrated the benefit of combination therapy (particularly for infliximab) in the form of higher week 54 remission rates and prevention of immunogenicity [2]. Notably, the week 54 remission rates were independent of infliximab trough levels or immunogenicity status, suggesting additional benefits apart from improving the pharmacokinetics of infliximab. This study aimed to provide further real-world data on the effect of combination therapy on clinical and pharmacokinetic outcomes.

Posted in ECCO News, Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Committee News, Y-ECCO, Volume 14, Issue 1

12June2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Georgina Cunningham

Georgina Cunningham

Early combined immunosuppression may be effective and safe in older patients with Crohn’s disease: post hoc analysis of REACT

Singh S, Stitt LW, Zou G, et al.

Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2019;49:1188–94.

Introduction

GCunningham photo
Georgina Cunningham 
© Georgina Cunningham

Due to the ageing population and the chronicity of the disease, increasing numbers of patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are now over the age of 60 [1]. The management of IBD in this group poses some challenges, mainly centered on the balance between risk of immunosuppression and the burden of active disease [2]. Although older IBD patients usually display a more indolent disease course, they are more likely to be hospitalised and have higher in-hospital mortality than their younger counterparts [3]. There is no doubt that there is room for improvement in our management of IBD in elderly patients, and guidance is needed to help physicians decide whether more aggressive treatment strategies, widely accepted in certain younger IBD patients [4], are also warranted in this cohort, and especially those at high risk of disease complications.

Posted in ECCO News, Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Committee News, Y-ECCO, Volume 14, Issue 2

12June2019

Y-ECCO Literature Review: Misha Kabir

Misha Kabir

Predictors of anti-TNF treatment failure in anti-TNF-naive patients with active luminal Crohn’s disease: A prospective, multicentre, cohort study

Kennedy NA, Heap GA, Green HD, Hamilton B, Bewshea C, Walker GJ, Thomas A, Nice R, Perry MH, Bouri S, Chanchlani N, Heerasing NM, Hendy P, Lin S, Gaya DR, Cummings JRF, Selinger CP, Lees CW, Hart AL, Parkes M, Sebastian S, Mansfield JC, Irving PM, Lindsay J, Russell RK, McDonald TJ, McGovern D, Goodhand JR, Ahmad T, UK Inflammatory Bowel Disease Pharmacogenetics Study Group*

Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019;4:341–53

Introduction

Misha Kabir photo2
Misha Kabir 
© Misha Kabir

The anti-TNF monoclonal antibodies infliximab and adalimumab have been integral to the management of Crohn’s Disease over the past two decades. However, primary non-response and secondary loss of response in the first year of treatment remain common, at 10%–40% [1–3] and 23%–46% [4] respectively. Immunogenicity has been implicated as an important predictive factor for anti-TNF therapy failure. However, target-to-treat drug and anti-drug antibody concentrations have not yet been validated in an adequately powered prospective study. The Personalised Anti-TNF Therapy in Crohn’s Disease Study (PANTS) aimed to investigate the factors that predict primary non-response, non-remission and adverse events with anti-TNF therapy in luminal Crohn’s Disease.

Posted in ECCO News, Y-ECCO Literature Reviews, Committee News, Y-ECCO, Volume 14, Issue 2

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